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Energy Newsbriefs Blog

This current awareness service is prepared by the WSU Energy Program Library with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy State Energy Program. This information is provided for energy professionals and interested members of the public to highlight recent energy-related news, articles, and reports that discuss energy efficiency, energy conservation, and renewable sources of energy in engineering and policy circles.

 

Category: Ventilation

Ventilation


Classroom Ventilation: Meeting Today's Challenges

Engineered Systems, May 2016, by Steven G. Liescheidt.
http://www.esmagazine.com/articles/97718-classroom-ventilation-meeting-todays-challenges

"Budgets, codes, and technologies are constantly shifting and evolving. These days, even the classrooms are often portable. Staying one step ahead will depend on your knowledge of current design options and how to integrate them into the space."

Classroom Ventilation: Meeting Today's Challenges

Engineered Systems, May 2, 2016, by Steven G. Liescheidt.
http://www.esmagazine.com/articles/97718-classroom-ventilation-meeting-todays-challenges

"Budgets, codes, and technologies are constantly shifting and evolving. These days, even the classrooms are often portable. Staying one step ahead will depend on your knowledge of current design options and how to integrate them into the space."

Design Considerations for Dedicated OA Systems

ASHRAE Journal, Mar. 2016, by Hugh Crowther and Yi Teng.
http://tinyurl.com/h4xlwh2

"Dedicated outdoor air systems (DOAS) decouple the heating, cooling, dehumidification and humidification of outdoor air from the space air-conditioning system. Common HVAC systems such as water (ground) source heat pumps, variable refrigerant flow (VRF), fan coils and chilled beams require a DOAS to meet ventilation requirements. But DOAS is a system, not a piece of equipment."

Applying Demand-Controlled Ventilation

ASHRAE Journal, Jan. 2016, by Xingbin Lin and Josephine Lau.
http://tinyurl.com/hhw2kab

"Demand-control ventilation (DCV) provides "automatic reduction of OA intake below design rates when the actual occupancy of spaces served by the system is less than design occupancy."1 CO2 sensing can be used to estimate the strength of occupant-related contaminant sources.2 This type of control approach is called CO2-based DCV. With a single-zone system, the breathing zone CO2 concentration can be used to directly control the outdoor air (OA) damper."

Optimizing Airflows In Foodservice Facilities, Part 2 - Optimizing Exhaust Air

Engineered Systems, Jan. 2016, by Doug Horton.
http://www.esmagazine.com/articles/97511-optimizing-airflows-in-foodservice-facilities-part-2--optimizing-exhaust-air

"Many methods await when it comes to reducing exhaust rates. Fortunately, engineers can avail themselves of multiple tactics, from the hood specification to proper commissioning and air balance."

VAV Terminal Units: Looking Back, Ahead

ASHRAE Journal, Oct. 2015, by Dan Int-Hout and Gus Faris
http://tinyurl.com/pzvcuc5

"July 2015's 'Basics of Well-Mixed Room Air Distribution' described how conditioned air moves throughout a space. In the Fundamentals at Work article, we discuss where the conditioned air comes from by exploring the most predominant products in use today: commercial building variable air volume (VAV) terminal units."

Pacific Northwest Residential Ventilation Effectiveness Study

Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, Sept. 14, 2015, by Ken Eklund and others.
http://neea.org/docs/default-source/reports/pacific-northwest-residential-ventilation-effectiveness-study.pdf?sfvrsn=6

"This report presents the findings and conclusions of the Pacific Northwest Residential Ventilation Effectiveness study in houses with low air leakage. The Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) commissioned the Washington State University (WSU) Energy Program to conduct the study, which included a total of twenty-nine houses in Washington State with five different types of ventilation systems. Exhaust ventilation (Exhaust Only (EO) and Exhaust with Inlet Vents (EI)) and heat recovery ventilation (HRV)/energy recovery ventilation (ERV) systems made up the largest share of the ventilation systems studied."

Venting Vapor

Building Science Corporation, July 15, 2015, by Joe Lstiburek.
http://buildingscience.com/documents/insights/bsi-088-venting-vapor

"Sometimes the obvious is not so obvious. And sometimes the not so obvious becomes obvious. For example installing leaky ductwork in a vented attic is a pretty dumb idea. It leads to negative pressures and high air change that depending on the time of year and climate zone results in part load humidity problems, ice damming, excessive energy use, loss of comfort, whatever. If radon were valuable we would mine it this way. Where there is an attached garage we call it the Kevorkian option. Everyone pretty much gets it."

Natural Ventilation: Bringing Fresh Air Into Commercial Buildings

The Construction Specifier, June 2015, by Michael P. Toohey.
http://www.constructionspecifier.com/natural-ventilation-bringing-fresh-air-into-commercial-buildings/

"This article discusses the history of ventilation, describes its principles, and compares it with mechanical ventilation. The issues examined consider when specifying a separate window and actuator compared to an integrated natural ventilation system; it also addresses the options available for natural ventilation."

DOAS Gaining Traction in US [Dedicated Outdoor Air Systems]

Air conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration News, June 15, 2015, by Jen Anesi.
http://www.achrnews.com/articles/129852-doas-gaining-traction-in-us

"Commercial building codes are mandating higher volumes of fresh-air intake than ever before. To help meet these ventilation requirements, more and more HVAC contractors and building owners are turning to dedicated outdoor air systems (DOAS). These systems most often run in parallel with other systems to deliver 100 percent outdoor air and handle latent loads. The units improve occupant health and comfort, and they are quickly gaining popularity in the U.S."
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