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Energy Newsbriefs Blog

This current awareness service is prepared by the WSU Energy Program Library with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy State Energy Program. This information is provided for energy professionals and interested members of the public to highlight recent energy-related news, articles, and reports that discuss energy efficiency, energy conservation, and renewable sources of energy in engineering and policy circles.

 

Category: Cogeneration

CHP


Best Practices for CHP Development

Power Engineering, Feb. 2017, by Thomas G. Adams.
http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-121/issue-2/features/best-practices-for-chp-development.html

"Combined heat and power (CHP) projects promise many benefits to a wide array of large energy users, and CHP has a long history of adoption and success in many industries. Despite its wide adoption, many energy users considering the development and installation of a CHP project face a set of tasks and challenges that they are not always fully equipped to handle since their primary business is usually quite different from power and thermal energy production. By focusing on best practices from the start of project development, to execution, and on to long term operation and maintenance, new owners of CHP systems can mitigate risks and maximize the chances of success for their project."

Why Would A Hospital Consider Absorption Chillers?

Engineered Systems, Nov. 2016, by Marcia Karr.
http://www.esmagazine.com/articles/98005-why-would-a-hospital-consider-absorption-chillers

"While CHP is good, CCHP can be even better for your facility and its locale. The author surveys the potential benefits, building code input, and electrical considerations. After a couple of case studies, she then reviews considerable engineering re-sources the DOE provides for those contemplating a forward-looking but proven design."

Optimizing Facility Operations with Cogeneration Systems

Consulting-Specifying Engineer, Nov. 2016, by Cynthia A. Callaway.
http://www.csemag.com/single-article/optimizing-facility-operations-with-cogeneration-systems/24f783746b2e9d47202376525bd3d1f4.html

"A cogeneration system is not a single technology, but an integrated energy system that can be modified depending upon the needs of the energy end user. This type of system burns natural gas to simultaneously produce electricity and heat (see Figure 2). The heat is recovered from the combustion system's exhaust stream and converted into useful thermal energy, in the form of steam or hot water, which is either used directly or fed into an absorption chiller to provide cooling."

Maximizing a Manufacturer’s Combined Heat and Power Plant

Consulting-Specifying Engineer, Nov. 14, 2016, by Andrew Price and Aaron Wickersham.
http://www.csemag.com/single-article/maximizing-a-manufacturers-combined-heat-and-power-plant/8dba326de767f993596c7d8e3ffcc9a8.html

"A Midwestern manufacturing facility opted for a hybrid combined-cycle steam turbine generator solution."

State of the States: Fuel Cells in America 2016

U.S. Department of Energy, Nov. 2016.
https://energy.gov/eere/fuelcells/downloads/state-states-fuel-cells-america-2016

"This November 2016 report, the seventh in a series, provides a comprehensive analysis of state activities supporting fuel cell and hydrogen technology, profiles of leading states, and a catalog of recent installations, policies, funding, and deployments around the country."

A Combined Heat & Power Renaissance in New York City

Power Engineering, Oct. 2016, by Devon Manz, Al Clark, and Michael Norelli.
http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-120/issue-10/features/a-combined-heat-power-renaissance-in-new-york-city.html

"...the confluence of low natural gas prices, high electric rates and the need for resilient power is motivating many commercial and industrial customers across the United States to return to Edison's original concept, where power is generated closer to where it is used. The drivers for this trend of on-site generation are perhaps strongest back in Edison's original test city of New York, where a combined heat and power (CHP) renaissance is underway."

Stanford University's "Fourth-Generation" District Energy System

District Energy, 4th Quarter 2016, by Joseph C. Stagner.
http://www.districtenergy-digital.org/districtenergy/2016q4?sub_id=DOwgMT0rNL8TV&folio=19&pg=21#pg21

"In 1987 Stanford took a giant step forward in efficiency and environmental stewardship with the installation of a 50 MW natural gas-fired cogeneration plant to provide electricity, steam and chilled water for its campus. Three decades later, the Cardinal Cogeneration plant has been replaced by the new $468 million Stanford Energy System Innovations (SESI) project...."

This is One of the Most Efficient Energy Sources Out There. So What’s Holding it Back? [Cogeneration]

Alberta Oil, Sept. 9, 2016, by Nick Wilson.
http://www.albertaoilmagazine.com/2016/09/cogeneration-one-efficient-energy-sources-whats-holding-back/

"Combined heat and power generation, or “cogeneration,” is clean power’s unsung hero. And the oil sands are its ground zero, supplying about 50 percent of Alberta’s 4,821 megawatts of electrical capacity, and pushing the province to the top of Canada’s “cogen” table. It’s not just ultra-efficient; it can be lucrative too. Oil sands operators have earned as much as $2.43 per barrel from power sales to the electricity grid."

CHP a ‘Powerful Combination’ For Plants

Plant Engineering, Jul/Aug 2016, by Roy Palk.
http://www.plantengineering.com/industry-news/electrical-news/single-article/chp-a-powerful-combination-for-plants/446268f173d8772b8d742dfdd394288a.html

"The pressure is on for industrial plants to become radically more energy efficient. The ongoing renaissance in combined heat and power (CHP), also known as cogeneration, is a major reason why."

The Intricacies of Pyrolyzer Furnace Design

Biomass Magazine, August 16, 2016, by Bradley Waites, Pamela Buzzetta and Crystal Bleecher.
http://biomassmagazine.com/articles/13482/the-intricacies-of-pyrolyzer-furnace-design

"Designing a pyrolyzer furnace is an intricate process. There’s more to the design than making a carbon steel box, lining the walls with refractory, running some process pipes through it, and heating the pipes with burners. While this may describe the design steps in vague detail, it doesn’t capture the intricacies involved in pyrolyzer furnace design. Knowing what to consider and evaluate can be the difference between success and failure."
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