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Energy Newsbriefs Blog

This current awareness service is prepared by the WSU Energy Program Library with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy State Energy Program. This information is provided for energy professionals and interested members of the public to highlight recent energy-related news, articles, and reports that discuss energy efficiency, energy conservation, and renewable sources of energy in engineering and policy circles.


Category: Windows


Secondary Glazing System (SGS) Thermal, Moisture, and Solar Performance Analysis and Validation

Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, Aug. 19, 2015, by Robert Hart, and others from LBNL.

"NEEA contracted with the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to conduct a study, from which this report is based, which simulates and physically validates the thermal and solar performance characteristics of seven window attachment secondary glazing systems (SGS), also known as Fixed Window Panels, using industry standard practices. Where industry standard practices do not exist, such as condensation resistance (CR) between base glazing and SGS, this report introduces new methodology and software capabilities. This report also evaluates the annual energy savings and condensation potential of all SGS systems in prototype commercial buildings."

New Rating System for Enhancing Window Energy Performance [Window Attachments]

U.S. Department of Energy, May 18, 2015.

"Window attachments, such as awnings, shutters, drapes, and solar shades, are often used for cosmetic purposes and to help control the amount of light entering a room. However, many Americans aren’t aware that identifying energy conserving window strategies are cost effective in homes and commercial buildings. Enter the Attachments Energy Rating Council (AERC). The Window Covering Manufacturers Association (WCMA) will cost-share Energy Department funding to help consumers realize potential energy savings from window attachments through the creation of a comprehensive energy ratings and certification program."

A Starring Role For Universal City [Hotel] Retrofit

Engineered Systems, Sept., 2014, by Tony Ghaffari.

"A Hilton in the heart of show biz transformed into a sustainable destination hotel with the help of chiller and cooling tower overhauls and improved BAS and ventilation strategies. Don’t miss the final plot twist before the system’s big launch party."

Glazing Systems: Considerations for the Mechanical Engineer

Consulting-Specifying Engineer, June 2014, by Jerry Bauers and George W. Houk.

"Window glazing and shading or louvers have a direct impact on the HVAC load of a building. Mechanical engineers often are tasked with specifying window and shading systems. Know about building envelope, and how it can be managed/altered by window system selection."

High-Tech Window Glazing

Green Builder, June 2014, by Suchi Rudra. (Scroll or jump to page 49.)

"When it comes to energy efficiency, windows are problematic; they're essentially holes in an otherwise insulated wall. Glass makes up about 15 percent of the wall space in an average home, and inefficient windows can cost over $700 a year in wasted heating and cooling costs. This loss accounts for approximately 2 percent of all energy consumption in the U.S. Upgrading window products, whether you retrofit or replace, means upgrading building performance and cutting back on hundreds of dollars in energy bills."

An Advanced Frame of Mind: Next-Generation Framing for Energy-Efficient Glazing

The Construction Specifier, Feb. 2014, by Chuck Knickerbocker.

"Curtain wall and window framing establishes the total possible area of unobstructed glazing, provides support for high-efficiency glass units, and can help improve thermal performance. With proper specification, it has the potential to help manage a building's lighting, heating, and cooling energy consumption. However, there is a fine line between good daylighting and increased energy consumption."


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