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Energy Newsbriefs Blog

This current awareness service is prepared by the WSU Energy Program Library with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy State Energy Program. This information is provided for energy professionals and interested members of the public to highlight recent energy-related news, articles, and reports that discuss energy efficiency, energy conservation, and renewable sources of energy in engineering and policy circles.

 

Category: Commercial

Commercial


Methods of Calculating Water Recovery From Air-Conditioning Cooling Coils, Part 2 of 2

HPAC Engineering, May 2015, by William G. Acker.
http://hpac.com/air-conditioning/methods-calculating-water-recovery-air-conditioning-cooling-coils-part-2-2

"Last month, in Part 1 of this article, we evaluated four equations used to determine the amount of water vapor removed from cooling coils in condensate-recovery applications. The accuracy of those equations varies, as some calculate only the removal of water vapor entering with the outside-air intake. This month, we will discuss more-accurate methods of calculating water-vapor removal and calculating the removal of all water-vapor loads by a cooling coil."

Methods of Calculating Water Recovery From Air-Conditioning Cooling Coils, Part 1 of 2

HPAC Engineering, Apr. 2015, by William G. Acker.
http://hpac.com/air-conditioning/methods-calculating-water-recovery-air-conditioning-cooling-coils-part-1-2

"In traditional building cooling, air passes through chilled cooling coils in air-handling units prior to entering a facility. As air passes over the coils, moisture in the air condenses into water on the coils. The water drips into a collection pan below and is sent to a sewer drain. Today, however, particularly in areas where water is scarce and rates are high, many building owners are collecting this water and using it to replenish cooling towers for irrigation and other uses."

LED vs. Induction Lighting: Which Illumination Solution is Right for Your Facility?

Buildings, Apr. 2015, by Janelle Penny.
http://www.buildings.com/article-details/articleid/18718/title/led-vs-induction-lighting.aspx

"Time for a lighting upgrade? You may be torn between LED and induction fixtures. Both offer low maintenance needs, are compatible with a variety of applications, and can secure energy savings. Familiarize yourself with the basics of these technologies to uncover which one will bring your project to light."

Getting to Outcome-Based Building Performance Event Report

New Building Institute, May 2015, by Mark Frankel and Jim Edelson.
http://newbuildings.org/performance-outcomes-event-report

"This report summarizes the work undertaken by a group of building industry thought leaders who gathered for a Performance Outcome Summit in August 2014 in Seattle, Washington. During a day and a half workshop, the group examined the opportunities, barriers and next steps that will transition the commercial building industry from estimating energy use, based on models in the design phase, to measuring real performance outcomes, based on actual energy use in an occupied building."

Selecting a Boiler for Heating, Process Loads

Consulting-Specifying Engineer, Apr. 2015, by Bradley A. Pankow.
http://www.csemag.com/single-article/selecting-a-boiler-for-heating-process-loads/346ed587852de8e21b053c91f7ec85d5.html

"Boilers for heating and domestic hot water systems are used in many nonresidential buildings and across educational, hospital, and industrial campuses. This article reviews the codes and standards that regulate boiler system specification and design, plus energy efficiency and efficacy of these boiler systems."

Integration: Lighting and HVAC systems

Consulting-Specifying Engineer, April 2015, by Chris Rush.
http://www.csemag.com/single-article/integration-lighting-and-hvac-systems/74d81a6dede2cff0f4dd8a689c13ad76.html

"By considering the first principles of radiative energy, engineers can determine how to balance daylight, electric light, and HVAC systems, particularly considering various options for daylight control and the advent of LEDs."

Portland City Council Approves Energy Performance Reporting for Commercial Buildings

City of Portland, Bureau of Planning and Sustainability, Apr. 22, 2015.
http://www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/article/527323

"On Earth Day, Portland City Council voted unanimously to approve a new policy that will require owners of commercial buildings over 20,000 square feet to track energy use and report it on an annual basis. The policy will cover nearly 80 percent of the commercial square footage and affect approximately 1,000 buildings."

Energy Optimization: Hand-Picking Products for Energy Performance

Building Operating Management, Mar. 2015, by Naomi Millán.
http://www.facilitiesnet.com/energyefficiency/article/Making-the-Right-Choice-with-Energy-Optimization-Products-and-Services--15743

An article in 6 parts:
Part 1: Making the Right Choice with Energy Optimization Products and Services Part 2: ROI, Applicability, Operational Impact Influence Energy Decisions
Part 3: Focus on Benefits, Product Credibility in Energy Optimization Purchases
Part 4: Best Practices for Energy Optimization
Part 5: Pilot Programs, Veterans’ Insights Help with Energy Optimization
Part 6: Introducing the Apex Award for Energy Optimization

Energy-Efficient Makeup Air Units

ASHRAE Journal, Mar. 2015, by Hugh Crowther.
http://bookstore.ashrae.biz/journal/download.php?file=2015Mar_026-033_Crowther.pdf

"Unless you live in paradise, delivering makeup air to most buildings is expensive. Table 1 shows the amount of work it takes to heat and cool air (based on Chicago conditions) for a standard rooftop unit (a unit that recirculates air with typical air conditioning loads) and a makeup air (MUA) unit."

LCCA for HVAC Systems

Consulting-Specifying Engineer, Mar. 2015, by David J. MacKay and Kohler Ronan.
http://www.csemag.com/single-article/lcca-for-hvac-systems/04e8a9c9fa723b70ef0b48829cb9b620.html

"Practically speaking, there are multiple building design options that can meet programmatic needs and achieve acceptable levels of performance. From a purely financial perspective, the only appropriate design alternative is the solution that satisfies the owner's project requirements for the lowest total cost of ownership. Lifecycle cost analysis (LCCA) is a powerful tool used to determine the most cost-effective option among competing alternatives. Although LCCA has been used for decades to reliably identify cost-optimal design solutions, many building owners and architecture and engineering professionals still rely on simple payback to make project investment decisions."
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The Energy Newsbriefs Blog is a continuation of the weekly Energy Newsbriefs. Please bookmark this site and return frequently. Although we will not be accepting comments from within the Blog, we would be happy to hear from you by email at library@energy.wsu.edu