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Energy Newsbriefs Blog

This current awareness service is prepared by the WSU Energy Program Library with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy State Energy Program. This information is provided for energy professionals and interested members of the public to highlight recent energy-related news, articles, and reports that discuss energy efficiency, energy conservation, and renewable sources of energy in engineering and policy circles.

 

Category: Biofuels

Biofuels


Symphony of the Microgrid at an Urban University

BioCycle, July 2014, by Marsha W. Johnston.
http://www.biocycle.net/2014/07/16/symphony-of-the-microgrid-at-an-urban-university/

"The University of California San Diego’s microgrid produces 92 percent of its annual electricity load and 95 percent of its heating and cooling load. A fuel cell powered by directed biogas is a cornerstone of the operation."

USDA, DOE and EPA Release Biogas Opportunities Roadmap

Biomass Magazine, Aug. 2014, by Erin Voegele.
http://biomassmagazine.com/articles/10761/usda-doe-and-epa-release-biogas-opportunities-roadmap

"The USDA has published its Biogas Opportunities Roadmap, a document that builds on progress made to date to identify voluntary actions that can be taken to reduce methane emissions through the use of biogas systems. It outlines strategies to overcome barriers limiting further expansion and development of a robust biogas industry in the U.S. The USDA also noted that the roadmap supports the U.S. dairy industry’s 2008 goal to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 25 percent by 2020."

Pass the Mustard: Why Carinata is Taking Root as Biofuel

North American Clean Energy, Jul/Aug 2014, by Don Konantz.
http://www.nacleanenergy.com/articles/18236/pass-the-mustard-why-carinata-is-taking-root-as-biofuel

"This new kid on the biofuel block taking root is the carinata seed. Carinata is a leafy plant, originating in Ethiopia. Also referred to as Ethiopian mustard and Abyssinian mustard, it produces oil seeds that can be (and have been) used as a biofuel, which mimic the attributes of its petroleum-derived counterpart. The oil seeds also work in ground and air transportation engines, and without engine modifications or blending. To date, carinata has demonstrated agronomic success across 60 commercial sites and farms in the Canadian and the US prairies."

How Sweet It Is: New Tool for Characterizing Plant Sugar Transporters Developed at Joint BioEnergy Institute

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory News Release, July 28, 2014, by Lynn Yarris.
http://newscenter.lbl.gov/2014/07/28/new-tool-for-characterizing-plant-sugar-transporters-developed-at-joint-bioenergy-institute/

"A powerful new tool that can help advance the genetic engineering of “fuel” crops for clean, green and renewable bioenergy, has been developed by researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI), a multi-institutional partnership led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). The JBEI researchers have developed an assay that enables scientists to identify and characterize the function of nucleotide sugar transporters, critical components in the biosynthesis of plant cell walls."

North Dakota's Subterranean Fuel Feedstock

Biomass Magazine, June 2014, by Chris Hanson.
http://biomassmagazine.com/articles/10458/north-dakotas-subterranean-fuel-feedstock

"When the advanced biofuel industry thinks feedstocks, ideas may drift toward dried corn stover on a freshly harvested field, or swathes of switchgrass or miscanthus swaying in the breeze. In the Red River Valley and Drift Prairie regions of North Dakota, however, the next advanced biofuel might be found below the ground in the form of sugar beets. But why sugar beets?" Includes a table that shows U.S 10-Year Sugar Beet Production, by state.

Building Farm And Food Scrap Digesters (Part I)

BioCycle, June 2014, by Nora Goldstein.
http://www.biocycle.net/2014/06/16/building-farm-and-food-scrap-digesters/

"A steady stream of anaerobic digestion facilities are coming on line, most equipped to process food waste. This first of a two-part series profiles several farm digesters. Part I"

Biofuel Technology Goes Mobile [Pyrolysis]

WSU College of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences (CAHNRS), Press Release, Jun. 2014.
http://news.cahnrs.wsu.edu/2014/06/11/biofuel-technology-goes-mobile/

"Scientists like Manuel Garcia-Perez and his graduate students, who study biosystems engineering at Washington State University, are helping to nurture the emerging biofuels industry by developing pyrolysis technologies. Garcia-Perez and Geraldo Ferreira-David of Brazil calculate material entering and exiting the pyrolysis system."

Effect of the Type of Bean, Processing, and Geographical Location on the Biodiesel Produced from Waste Coffee Grounds

Energy Fuels, 2014, by Rhodri W. Jenkins, et. al.
http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/ef4022976

"Waste coffee grounds offer a viable waste feedstock for biodiesel production. Approximately 8 million tonnes of coffee are produced globally each year and contain up to 15 wt % lipid, of which the glyceride portion is predominantly made up of palmitic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic acids. In this investigation, the variation in the oil content, saponifiable lipids, and lipid profile according to the regional location and processing or brewing techniques was assessed. A number of key fuel properties were also investigated."


Biofuels Progress: Where Do We Stand?

Solar Today, May/Jun 2014, by Seth Masia.
http://www.omagdigital.com/publication/?m=23867&l=1&p=22

"As ethanol stalls, the military and airlines push hard for new biojet fuels. Where will they come from?"

Poplars Designed for Deconstruction: A Major Boon to Biofuels

University of Wisconsin-Madison News, Apr. 3, 2014.
http://www.news.wisc.edu/22698

"What began 20 years ago as an innovation to improve paper industry processes and dairy forage digestibility may now open the door to a much more energy- and cost-efficient way to convert biomass into fuel.

Michigan State University Associate Professor and (GLBRC) scientist Curtis Wilkerson describes his and University of Wisconsin-Madison colleagues’ paper, appearing in the April 4 issue of Science, as 'a rare, top-down approach to engineering plants – in this case poplars – for digestibility
.'"
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The Energy Newsbriefs Blog is a continuation of the weekly Energy Newsbriefs. Please bookmark this site and return frequently. Although we will not be accepting comments from within the Blog, we would be happy to hear from you by email at library@energy.wsu.edu

Archives of the weekly Energy Newsbriefs, from Oct. 2012 – Jan. 6, 2014, may be found on the WSU Energy Library web page.

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