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Energy Newsbriefs Blog

This current awareness service is prepared by the WSU Energy Program Library with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy State Energy Program. This information is provided for energy professionals and interested members of the public to highlight recent energy-related news, articles, and reports that discuss energy efficiency, energy conservation, and renewable sources of energy in engineering and policy circles.

 

Category: Codes/Standards

Codes/Standards


Navigating Energy Code Compliance For Metal Buildings

Insulation Outlook, Feb. 2016, by Hal Robbins.
http://www.insulationoutlook.com/io/article.cfm?id=IO160203

"Understanding and complying with today’s evolving energy codes and standards presents unique challenges for architects, designers, and builders of pre-engineered metal buildings.... In an effort to navigate (and hopefully simplify) energy code compliance, the intent of this article is to help specifiers determine code adoption status using web-based tools and to review various high R-Value/Low U-Factor insulation systems currently available for metal building roofs and walls that provide code compliant options."

Frequently Overlooked Requirements of 90.1-2013

ASHRAE Journal, Jan. 2016, by Daniel H. Nall.
http://tinyurl.com/hf6sxml

"ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings, has evolved rapidly over the years. As it has evolved, the requirements have changed, and some of these requirements have been overlooked by the engineering community. Some of these requirements are mandatory, meaning they must be incorporated on all projects for which they are applicable, and others are prescriptive."


Applying Demand-Controlled Ventilation

ASHRAE Journal, Jan. 2016, by Xingbin Lin and Josephine Lau.
http://tinyurl.com/hhw2kab

"Demand-control ventilation (DCV) provides "automatic reduction of OA intake below design rates when the actual occupancy of spaces served by the system is less than design occupancy."1 CO2 sensing can be used to estimate the strength of occupant-related contaminant sources.2 This type of control approach is called CO2-based DCV. With a single-zone system, the breathing zone CO2 concentration can be used to directly control the outdoor air (OA) damper."

U.S. Leaders in Energy Management Eligible for New Global Award

U.S. Department of Energy, Jan. 21, 2016.
http://energy.gov/eere/amo/articles/us-leaders-energy-management-eligible-new-global-award

"The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is taking part in a prestigious new global awards program to recognize companies or organizations that use an ISO 50001-certified energy management system (EnMS) to save energy and reduce costs. The Energy Management Leadership Awards program should expand global use of these proven systems and help attain national and global climate goals."

Hydraulic Institute Supports the Pump Industry as the DOE Issues Final Rules on Test Procedures and Energy Conservation Standards For Commercial And Industrial Pumps

Water Online, Jan.. 6, 2016.
http://www.wateronline.com/doc/hydraulic-institute-pump-industry-doe-test-procedures-industrial-pumps-0001

"The Hydraulic Institute, North America’s largest pump trade association, announces the release of two final rules (1) The Energy Conservation Standard and (2) The Test Procedure for Commercial and Industrial Pumps by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The rulings are now available through the HI website. The compliance date for the Energy Conservation Standard will be 2020 and DOE estimates it will save 0.29 quadrillion BTUs (2020 – 2050)."

How Efficient Are Energy Codes?

EcoBuilding Pulse, Jan. 5, 2016, by Ryan Meres.
http://www.ecobuildingpulse.com/news/how-efficient-are-energy-codes_s

"Last year the U.S. Department of Energy ( DOE) announced that eight states would be part of a three-year Residential Energy Code Field Study. Once completed, the study will provide an unprecedented opportunity to develop new strategies for education, training, and outreach for improving the energy efficiency of single-family homes, as well as a measurement of the impact those activities have on residential energy use. Preliminary results from the largest residential energy code field study ever conducted in the U.S. show they do."

Pumps: State of Global Efficiency Standards (Part 1 of 2)

Pumps & Systems, Nov. 2015, by Lev Nelik.
http://www.pumpsandsystems.com/pumps/november-2015-state-global-efficiency-standards

"Despite an increasing focus on energy savings around the world, no formal standard—that is also simple and practical—exists. A recent pump energy conference in the Middle East took a comparative look at available resources on the subject in the U.S., Europe, Israel and other areas of the world. Several fledgling documents on formalizing the approach are in the works, but nothing is complete to the point of availability to the pumping community."

Lighting and the Energy Codes

Consulting-Specifying Engineer, Oct. 2015, by Kenneth L. Lovorn.
http://www.csemag.com/single-article/lighting-and-the-energy-codes/494b201472d868627c7e63920bdde3d3.html

"Engineers have many resources when designing energy-efficient lighting in nonresidential buildings. Lighting designers do not have to sacrifice quality or reduce lighting levels just to meet energy codes."

Indoor Air Quality in Hospitals

Consulting-Specifying Engineer, July 2015, by Christopher J. Stipe.
http://www.csemag.com/single-article/indoor-air-quality-in-hospitals/b4a355bfbd61c4902f08216c20be3e8e.html

"Hospitals and health care facilities must comply with ASHRAE and other regulatory standards with respect to air change rates, humidity requirements, and pressurization. ASHRAE Standard 62.1 is the most commonly referenced standard to meet appropriate HVAC system design. Other factors to consider include the use of UV light to reduce hospital-acquired infections, unique air requirements, and outdoor air systems."

Methodological Comparison of Cost-effectiveness of IECC Residential Energy Codes

ICF International, submitted to the Energy Efficient Codes Coalition, Jul. 21, 2015.

"ICF was asked to conduct an analysis of building energy codes, comparing life-cycle cost analysis (LCC) – the predominant method used to evaluate the cost effectiveness of energy codes and other public policies – with two other cost-effectiveness methods: simple payback and mortgage cash-flow. Since a significant proposal before Congress would designate simple payback as the principal basis for energy code cost-effectiveness, representing a departure from decades of policy analysis practice, it is important to provide a robust comparison of simple payback to the LCC and mortgage cash-flow methods. ...this study provides a rigorous, consistent, quantified comparison of these three methodologies."

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The Energy Newsbriefs Blog is a continuation of the weekly Energy Newsbriefs. Please bookmark this site and return frequently. Although we will not be accepting comments from within the Blog, we would be happy to hear from you by email at library@energy.wsu.edu