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Energy Newsbriefs Blog

The WSU Energy Program Library prepares this current awareness blog with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy State Energy Program. These articles highlight energy-related news, articles, and reports about energy efficiency, energy conservation, and renewable sources of energy for energy professionals and interested members of the public.


Best Practices for CHP Development

Power Engineering, Feb. 2017, by Thomas G. Adams.
http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-121/issue-2/features/best-practices-for-chp-development.html

"Combined heat and power (CHP) projects promise many benefits to a wide array of large energy users, and CHP has a long history of adoption and success in many industries. Despite its wide adoption, many energy users considering the development and installation of a CHP project face a set of tasks and challenges that they are not always fully equipped to handle since their primary business is usually quite different from power and thermal energy production. By focusing on best practices from the start of project development, to execution, and on to long term operation and maintenance, new owners of CHP systems can mitigate risks and maximize the chances of success for their project."

Compressed Air System Commissioning Part 1: Why Do It?

Compressed Air Best Practices, Feb. 2017, by Tim Dugan.
http://www.airbestpractices.com/system-assessments/compressor-controls/compressed-air-system-commissioning-part-1-why-do-it

"“Retro-Commissioning” (ReCX) of compressed air systems has become a trendy activity with many utility demand-side-management programs emerging in the last 5-10 years.  This is intended to be the process of “tuning up” a compressed air system, getting low cost savings from mostly adjustments and repairs.  The term was borrowed from the building/HVAC industry, where it means to get a system operating as it was originally “commissioned”."

Steam Turbine Retrofits: Methods to Extend Turbine Life and Improve Performance

Power Engineering, Feb. 2017, by Muhammad Saqib Riaz. http://www.power-eng.com/articles/print/volume-121/issue-2/features/steam-turbine-retrofits.html "A steam turbine is designed and optimized for a specific set of steam conditions. After long term operations either the steam path components deteriorate or due to changes in steam conditions, a re-optimization of the steam path components is required to regain higher turbine performance. Steam Turbine retrofits are performed to achieve various goals such as improved turbine efficiencies, heat rate or power output. Retrofits are also performed to address turbine reliability and or maintenance issues. Availability of newer technologies and materials for steam path components can be utilized to not only increase steam turbine performance, but also to extend maintenance intervals, and extend life. Retrofits can also accommodate required changes to the thermal cycle based on emerging needs of the power plant. The effectiveness of the retrofit is achieved by ut ... Read the rest of entry »

Preliminary Energy Savings Announced for ASHRAE/IES 2016 Energy Standard [90.1]

Engineered Systems, Feb. 2017.
http://www.esmagazine.com/articles/98173

"More than 30% energy savings can be achieved using the 2016 version of Standard 90.1, according ASHRAE. The savings was found during a recent analysis conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program."

New Database for Hundreds of Test Reports [Wind Turbine Maintenance]

Wind Systems Magazine, Feb. 2017, by Thomas Arnold.
http://www.windsystemsmag.com/article/detail/1392/new-database-for-hundreds-of-test-reports

"Computer program summarizes test results from periodic turbine inspections."

Optimized Energy Recovery

ASHRAE Journal, Jan. 2017, by Marvin Kirshenbaum.
http://ashraecok.org/images/downloads/Technical_Literature/journal_2017_01_optimized_energy_recovery.pdf

"This article addresses extending the application of waste heat recovery to both reheat and primary heating, allowing for a heat reclaim system no longer restricted to seasonal operation."

Measuring the True Costs and Benefits of Energy Storage

North American Clean Energy, Jan. 2016.
http://www.nacleanenergy.com/articles/22174/measuring-the-true-costs-and-benefits-of-energy-storage

"Part One: A quick guide to calculating cost & safety."

A New Spin On VRF & Ventilation [in a School]

Engineered Systems, Feb. 2017, by John Parris Frantz.
http://www.esmagazine.com/articles/98147-a-new-spin-on-vrf-ventilation

"A Tennessee district faced an old school HVAC challenge: aging ventilators and space constraints. So this team tried a new-school variation on common VRF retrofits to deliver improved efficiency and critical IAQ: they decentralized the outdoor air, combining enthalpy wheel and VRF components within a single classroom enclosure."

Where To Place Air-Cooled Chillers

Engineered Systems, Feb. 2017, by Kishor Khankari.
http://www.esmagazine.com/articles/98146-where-to-place-air-cooled-chillers

"Warm discharge plumes sweeping back into air-cooled condensers is nobody’s idea of an ideal performance environment. This CFD study shows how wind speed, wind direction, spacing between chillers, and separation from adjacent buildings all factor into the conversation about the best defense against unwanted hot air."

Mapping Coal’s Decline and Renewables' Rise

MIT Energy Futures, Autumn 2016, by Francesca McCaffrey.
http://news.mit.edu/2016/mapping-coal-decline-and-renewables-rise-0622

"A new study from MIT researchers, however, shows that coal’s economic edge may soon be far thinner than we think. In a working paper for the MIT Energy Initiative, graduate students Joel Jean, David C. Borrelli, and Tony Wu show how replacing current coal-fired power plants with wind and solar photovoltaic generation facilities could provide benefits for the environment and for bottom lines in the near future. The online tool they’ve created to help illustrate this argument is CoalMap, a web application that compares the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) — that is, the minimum electricity price a power plant must receive to break even on investment costs over its lifecycle — of existing U.S. coal-fired plants with the expected LCOE of potential new utility-scale solar and wind generation in the same locations."
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The Energy Newsbriefs Blog is a continuation of the weekly Energy Newsbriefs. Please bookmark this site and return frequently. Although we will not be accepting comments from within the Blog, we would be happy to hear from you by email at library@energy.wsu.edu