Bookmark and Share

Industrial Newsbriefs

June 2011

Welcome to this edition of Industrial Newsbriefs, produced by the Washington State University Extension Energy Program, and sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). Please forward this issue to those of your colleagues interested in industrial energy efficiency. View archive 

While every URL in Industrial Newsbriefs is checked for accuracy prior to distribution, URLs may change and servers may temporarily fail to connect to working URLs.


INDUSTRIAL EFFICIENCY RESOURCE OF THE MONTH

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints map fuel energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors.

This resource is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy EERE Industrial Technologies Program.

COGENERATION

"It’s Time to Think Small About Cogeneration," written by Gary Faagua and published on May 20, 2011, in Sustainable Plant, discusses the advantages of adding a small turbine to contribute heat to a small furnace, rather than investing in a large gas turbine generator. The author calculates a net benefit from a small turbine addition vs. a generator purchase, and also recognizes obstacles which have slowed the adoption of this technology.

COMPRESSED AIR

"How Much is Your Air System Really Costing?" provides information and guidance for compressed air system analyses, efficiency improvements, and cost reductions. This informative article lays out the basics for a systems approach to compressed air management, and emphasizes the value of training programs such as those provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This article was written by Ron Marshall and Bill Scales for the Compressed Air Challenge, and appears in the May 2011 issue of Maintenance Technology.

HVAC/R (HEATING, VENTILATION, AIR CONDITIONING, AND REFRIGERATION)

"A Balanced Approach" was authored by Jeff Moe, Director, Global Policy and Advocacy, at the Center for Energy Efficiency and Sustainability at Ingersoll Rand; it was published in the March 2011 issue of HPAC Heating, Plumbing, Air Conditioning Magazine. This includes a history of the effort to discover effective and safe refrigerants that charts the phasing out of various refrigerants deemed environmentally unsafe beginning in 1990. The author notes that a refrigerant can negatively impact the environment in two ways. It can simply leak into the atmosphere, of course. It can, also, negatively affect the environment if it refrigerates inefficiently, meaning that it needs more energy to accomplish the required cooling levels. Both impacts are covered well.

New issue of Cold Front now available

The latest issue of Cold Front, published May 13, 2011, by the Industrial Refrigeration Consortium (IRC), is now available for download. This issue’s feature article is "Pressure Relief Capacity Determination for Equipment."

THERMAL TECHNOLOGIES

"The Sky's the Limit" was co-authored by Louis Michaud, President, AVEtec Energy Corp, and Nilton Renno, Professor, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanographic, and Space Science, University of Michigan; it was published in the April 2011 issue of Mechanical Engineering. The small success of a fuel-less power plant in Spain was not enough to attract large-scale commercialization; the simple column of rising air within its cooling tower resulted in no more than a 50kW output. However, the author suggests a design improvement that could make a difference. In a thermal power plant, a vortex of rising air, induced by an "atmospheric vortex engine," in the same-sized tower could dramatically extend the updraft to miles above the tower. More waste heat would be converted to energy so the effectiveness of the tower would be greatly magnified. This would make the tower more cost-effective as is, without physically (and expensively) extending it. The technology has not been proved in a full-scale plant.

The following four articles appeared in the March 2011 issue of Industrial Heating:

1. "Applying High-Temperature Heat-Pipe Technology to Precision Heat Treating and Materials Processing" was written by Peter Dussinger, Vice President for Custom Products, Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. The author describes what heat pipes are, how they are designed for different functions, and the all important range of temperatures within which heat pipes can operate.

2. "Carbon Controlling with O2-Probe and L-Probe," by D. Mikulovic´, MESA Electronic GmbH (Leitenstr., Geretsried, Germany), discusses the gas carburizing process in the context of the carbon-potential (C-potential) of a furnace atmosphere. The author carefully explains how to determine the C-potential and how to control it. The O2-probe and the L-probe are described and the uncertain measurements yielded by the O2-probe in certain circumstances are delineated. The L-probe has several important advantages over the O2-probe, which are explained.

3. "Maintenance for Cooling Towers: Protecting Process-Cooling Systems from Costly 'Fatigue'," was authored by Tom Ryder, Support Specialist, Delta Cooling Towers, Inc. The author explains that poorly maintained cooling towers are, in the end, very costly ones, whether in the pulp and paper, chemical processing, or injection-molding industries. He makes suggestions about both ordinary and preventative repairs and adresses the difficult decision of whether to try to repair an ailing cooling tower or to replace it.

4. "New Capabilities in HPGQ Vacuum Furnaces," was jointly authored by M. Korecki, SECO/WARWICK (Swiebodzin, Poland); J. Kula, Technical University of Lodz (Lodz, Poland); and J. Olejnik, SECO/WARWICK (Swiebodzin, Poland). This is a discussion of high-pressure gas-quenching (HPGQ) vacuum furnaces including their common applications, their reduced assembly times, and how they can employ power control systems with excellent energy savings.

POLICY AND LEGISLATION

EPA issues stay on rules for boilers and incinerators

On May 16, 2011, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a stay on the air toxics standards for industrial boilers and incinerators published in the Federal Register on March 21, 2011. The action delays the implementation of the new rules until the proceedings for judicial review are completed, or until EPA completes its reconsideration of the standards, whichever occurs first. Public comments will be accepted until July 15, 2011, and can be submitted to combustionsurvey@erg.com. For further information and background, see the EPA fact sheet EPA’s Next Step for the Reconsideration of the Final Air Toxics Standards for Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers and Process Heaters at Major Source Facilities and Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units.

Bipartisan bill proposes energy efficiency measures for buildings and industry

A bipartisan bill, the Energy Savings and Industrial Competitiveness Act of 2011 (S. 1000), was introduced in the U.S. Senate on May 12, 2011. If passed, the bill would support the formation of national building model energy codes, assist in the development of a building training and assessment workforce, expand the Department of Energy (DOE) loan guarantee program, and provide zero-interest loans to rural public utilities and electric cooperatives to support low-interest energy efficiency loans for customers. A summary of the bill is available on the Alliance to Save Energy (ASE) website, or read the May 17, 2011, article "Sens. Shaheen, Portman Introduce a National Energy Efficiency Strategy."

DOE advisory panel to pursue safe, environmentally sound fracturing of natural gas from shale

A specialized group of industry, state, and environmental experts will identify and develop best practices to maximize the safety and environmental performance of natural gas hydraulic fracturing from shale formations. The group was convened by Department of Energy (DOE) secretary Steven Chu as part of the national Blueprint for a Secure Energy Future. For further information, read the May 5, 2011, press release.

RESEARCH

Global Energy Efficiency Improvement in the Long Term: a Demand- and Supply-Side Perspective, by Wina Graus, Elaine Blomen, and Ernst Worrell, is a research article to be published in the August 2011 issue of Energy Efficiency. The authors examine energy efficiency in a global context, weighing projected supply and demand for developed and developing countries and how they might be affected by best practices and emerging technologies. Detailed examples of these effects are given for the cement, ammonia, chlorine, and aluminum production industries.

Whiskey waste could find second life as biofuel

Scientists at Edinburgh Napier University in Scotland have developed a patented process for converting the waste products of whiskey production (pot ale and draff) into a biofuel which can be used directly in ordinary gas-burning cars. For details, see "Scots Develop Process to Turn Whisky Waste Products into Biofuels," published May 24, 2011, in Sustainable Plant.

GRANTS AND FUNDING

Open Manufacturing (presolicitation)
DARPA-BAA-11-54
Response date: Jun 23, 2011
The vision of the Open Manufacturing program is to reduce barriers to manufacturing innovation, speed, and affordability of materials, components, and structures. This will be achieved by 1) investing in technologies to enable affordable, rapid, adaptable, energy-efficient manufacturing and fabrication processes, 2) promoting comprehensive manufacturing design, simulation and performance prediction tools, and 3) facilitating exposure to best practices. Specifically, the program will seek development and demonstration of technologies that reduce impediments to the efficient manufacturing of affordable, competitive products that rapidly enter into service at low fiscal and environmental costs.

International Industrial Energy Efficiency Training
DE-FOA-0000531
Response date: June 16, 2011
This funding opportunity announcement is directed toward the development of U.S. international training capabilities in energy efficiency and management in key manufacturing sectors worldwide, including the performance of assessments of energy facilities. The successful outcome of this announcement would be the development of this training capability by U.S.-based companies and the accelerated deployment of energy saving and Green House Gas (GHG) emission reduction opportunities. In addition, this accelerated deployment of energy saving and GHG emission reduction opportunities is anticipated to increase the market for state-of-the-art U.S. technologies and services in the countries of interest. Applications should address activities/tasks which target the training of auditors in industrial energy efficiency and adaptations of successful techniques used in the U.S. to energy intensive industries such as aluminum, steel and cement manufacturing.

UPCOMING EVENTS AND TRAININGS

Pacific Northwest

Steam Systems Assessment Training
Rescheduled: July 6, 2011, 7:30 AM - 4:30 PM (formerly June 7)
Port Angeles, Washington
The Steam System Assessment Training covers the operation of typical steam systems and discusses methods of system efficiency improvement. The one-day workshop is designed for end users – at the energy manager, steam system supervisor, engineer, and operations level – who have steam system responsibilities in industrial and institutional plants. The workshop is divided into three major categories: Steam Generation Efficiency, Resource Utilization Effectiveness, and Steam Distribution System Losses. For more information, contact Julie Nurse at nursej@energy.wsu.edu.

Steam Systems Assessment Training
Additional Location: July 20, 2011, 7:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Nampa, Idaho
The Steam System Assessment Training covers the operation of typical steam systems and discusses methods of system efficiency improvement. The one-day workshop is designed for end users – at the energy manager, steam system supervisor, engineer, and operations level – who have steam system responsibilities in industrial and institutional plants. The workshop is divided into three major categories: Steam Generation Efficiency, Resource Utilization Effectiveness, and Steam Distribution System Losses. For more information, contact Julie Nurse at nursej@energy.wsu.edu. This event is co-sponsored by the Idaho Office of Energy Resources, Bonneville Power Administration, the Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, the Northwest Food Processor's Association, the Washington State University Extension Energy Program, and the U.S. Department of Energy.

Advanced Management of Compressed Air Systems
July 12-13, 2011
Pocatello, Idaho
This advanced course in compressed air system management teaches you to develop a system profile and address point-of-use issues, including determining actual air quality requirements, investigating and reducing highest point-of-use pressure requirements, and addressing high-volume intermittent applications. In addition, you will learn how to implement a compressed air system maintenance program, determine different compressor control strategies, align the supply-side to demand-side operation, and gain an understanding of the value of heat recovery. Participants will also gain knowledge on how to successfully present project proposals to management.

Industrial Refrigeration Systems Energy Management
July 21, 2011, 7:30 AM-4:30 PM
Yakima, WA
With a focus on industrial refrigeration systems that use ammonia as the refrigerant, this training will equip attendees with the knowledge and tools to reduce energy usage and operating costs, and improve the reliability of refrigeration systems. Training will focus on technical basics, operation of refrigeration systems, energy efficiency potentials, and case studies of successful energy efficiency projects and imple mentation strategies. Participants will receive a copy of the Industrial Refrigeration Best Practices Guide, which serves as the course’s technical foundation and a roadmap for making industrial refrigeration systems both energy efficient and productive. With the knowledge and tools gained, past attendees and their customers have implemented low/no cost strategies resulting in annual energy savings greater than $50,000. This training is coordinated by NEEA Industrial Training and sponsored by Pacific Power, Bonneville Power Administration, Washington State University Energy Program, and Northwest Food Processors Association.

Other Events, Trainings, and Webinars

IRC Engineering Safety Relief Systems Webcourse
June 13-17, 7:00 – 9:00 AM PST
This workshop is your opportunity to develop or improve your understanding of engineered safety relief systems. Our primary focus is industrial refrigeration systems using anhydrous ammonia but many of the principles we will discuss apply equally to other applications & refrigerants as well.

West Coast Energy Management Congress
June 15-16, 2011, Long Beach, CA
The West Coast Energy Management Congress (EMC) is the largest energy conference and technology expo held on the U.S. West Coast specifically for business, industrial and institutional energy users. It brings together the top experts in all areas of the field to help you set a clear, optimum path to energy efficiency, facility optimization and sustainability, as well as innovation solutions to improve your ROI.

Webinar: Fundamentals of Pumping System Assessments
June 19, 2011, 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM PST
Pump users, especially those who specify, operate and maintain pumping systems are invited to attend a briefing by HI and Pump Systems Matter on "Fundamentals of Pumping Systems Assessments" and learn about the new ASME EA-2-2009 standard. The EA-2-2009 Standard sets the requirements for conducting and reporting the results of pumping system assessments. It considers the entire pumping system, from energy inputs to the work performed as the result of these inputs.

Webinar: Fundamentals of Pumping System Assessments: An overview of the ASME Energy Assessment for Pumping Systems Standard
June 29, 2011, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PST
This free, one hour webinar provides an overview of new ASME EA-2-2009 Standard, which sets the requirements for conducting and reporting the results of pumping system assessments. This webinar is offered by the Hydraulic Institute and Pump Systems Matters.

Tuesday Webcast for Industry: A Discussion of New ITP Tools and Resources for Industry
July 12, 2011, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PST
ITP offers a collection of free software tools to help you identify and analyze energy system savings opportunities in your plant or industrial facility. This Webcast will focus on the variety of new tools and resources for its industrial stakeholders. Craig Cheney of Project Performance Corporation will discuss the updated energy management kit, and the forthcoming ITP/BTP tool suite. The Webcast will also focus on how industry is using ITP’s tools and resources to conduct energy assessments, implement projects, and communicate the importance of energy efficiency in industry.

Webinar: Fundamentals of Pumping System Assessments
August 4, 2011, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PST
This free, one hour webinar provides an overview of new ASME EA-2-2009 Standard, which sets the requirements for conducting and reporting the results of pumping system assessments. This webinar is offered by the Hydraulic Institute and Pump Systems Matters.

Steam Systems Management
August 24, 2011
Downey, California
This 1-day course covers the operation of typical steam systems and discusses methods of system efficiency improvement. The training helps industrial and institutional plant personnel—energy managers, steam system supervisors, engineers, and equipment operators—identify opportunities to improve steam system performance.

Energy Efficiency in Motor-Driven Systems (EEMODS) ‘11
September 12-14, 2011, Alexandra, VA
This event provides a forum for discussion of many motor management topics including: developments in motor and system efficiency, energy management, and how to define system efficiency. EEMODS participants include a wide variety of industry stakeholders involved in manufacturing, marketing, and promotion of energy efficient motors and motor-driven systems.

Steam End User Training – E-Learning
Self-paced online workshop
This course covers the operation of typical steam systems and discusses methods of system efficiency improvement. A brief demonstration of the BestPractices Steam System Tool Suite software is highlighted to help identify and quantify savings from selected potential improvement examples. The training is designed for plant personnel, such as energy managers, steam system supervisors, engineers, and equipment operators, who have steam system responsibilities in industrial and institutional plants.

Steam Systems E-Learning
Self-paced online workshop
This training course will provide an overview of the BestPractices Steam Tool Suite. The training course will begin with a navigational tutorial to guide you on how to move through the three modules. Each training module will demonstrate the capability of one tool and its interactions with the other tools. Interactive quizzes will be used to test your basic understanding of the tools after you complete the course.

MORE TRAININGS IN INDUSTRIAL ENERGY EFFICIENCY

For a listing of other upcoming industrial energy efficiency trainings, visit the following websites:

Energy Events Calendar

Northwest Regional Training Calendar

U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Best Practices Training Calendar

Input Requested: Is there something else you would like to see in Industrial Newsbriefs?

If you have thoughts or ideas for what you would like to see in this publication, please email suggestions to Talia Mathews at MathewsT@energy.wsu.edu . We strive to keep this publication as useful and relevant as possible to you, our readers.


Past issues available here